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D2005-33

Dear Daisy Dog

I think my 10-year-old Labrador retriever has arthritis. She is stiff when she gets up, and she has trouble climbing the stairs.

Ibuprofen works well for me. Is it okay for her?

Daisy Responds

No. Ibuprofen, marketed under such trade names as Motrin and Advil, is exceedingly hard on our canine stomachs.

Dogs’ stomachs are four times more sensitive than human stomachs.

In one study, dogs given just a bit more than the therapeutic dose of ibuprofen for one month developed stomach ulcers and intestinal inflammation.

At twice that dose for two months, dogs suffered vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stools and weight loss.

In another report, one dog on ibuprofen died of a perforated stomach ulcer after taking only half the therapeutic dose for six weeks.

To be considered safe, a medication should have a wide margin between the therapeutic dose and the toxic dose. This wide margin protects those dogs who, like some of you humans, are particularly sensitive to certain medications.

Unfortunately, ibuprofen’s safety margin in dogs is much too narrow.

My brother Sam has arthritis, too, and he has found that the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs approved for dogs by the Food and Drug Administration are quite effective.

Moreover, they have been shown through repeated testing and clinical use to be safe for our sensitive canine stomachs.

So ask your veterinarian to evaluate your dog’s arthritis and prescribe medication that is both effective and safe.
No. Ibuprofen, marketed under such trade names as Motrin and Advil, is exceedingly hard on our canine stomachs.
Dogs’ stomachs are four times more sensitive than human stomachs.

In one study, dogs given just a bit more than the therapeutic dose of ibuprofen for one month developed stomach ulcers and intestinal inflammation.

At twice that dose for two months, dogs suffered vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stools and weight loss.

In another report, one dog on ibuprofen died of a perforated stomach ulcer after taking only half the therapeutic dose for six weeks.

To be considered safe, a medication should have a wide margin between the therapeutic dose and the toxic dose.

This wide margin protects those dogs who, like some of you humans, are particularly sensitive to certain medications.
Unfortunately, ibuprofen’s safety margin in dogs is much too narrow.

My brother Sam has arthritis, too, and he has found that the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs approved for dogs by the Food and Drug Administration are quite effective.

Moreover, they have been shown through repeated testing and clinical use to be safe for our sensitive canine stomachs.

So ask your veterinarian to evaluate your dog’s arthritis and prescribe medication that is both effective and safe.

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