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C2003-50

Dear Christopher Cat

I recently adopted a four-year-old spayed female cat. She was raised by a friend who rescued her as a feral kitten.
My cat is still “skitterish” about petting, but she meows and chirps at me often. Except for the plaintiff “feed me” meow, I have not been able to interpret her language.

What is she saying to me?

Christopher Responds

To answer your question, I consulted my brother Dom, the most vocal cat I know.

He chirps in greeting, calls to Mom when he can’t find her, meows when it’s time for his medicine, purrs in contentment, groans in ecstasy when his face is rubbed, and yowls to announce that he wants to play but can’t find a partner.

Some cats vocalize when they are in pain, such as with a bladder infection, or when they have a disease like hyperthyroidism or dental disease.

Still other cats vocalize when they are suffering from separation anxiety or senility.

Have your veterinarian check your new kitty to be sure she is free of pain and disease. If she is healthy, give her extra attention to help relieve any anxiety associated with moving into your home.

Then enjoy the years ahead as you learn your cat’s own unique language.

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